(Source: amajor7)

mgarrizon11:

A survivor from the massacre that happened in Ayotzinapa, Mexico retelling what happened the night that the 43 missing students were last seen.

booklover:

born—to—resist:

DORIS LESSING 22 October 1919 – 17 November 2013

There is only one way to read, which is to browse in libraries and bookshops, picking up books that attract you, reading only those, dropping them when they bore you, skipping the parts that drag and never, never reading anything because you feel you ought, or because it is a part of a trend or a movement. Remember that the book wich bores you when you are twenty or thirty will open doors for you when you are forty or fifty and viceversa. Don’t read a book out of its right time for you.
“The golden notebook”

"Language is power. When you turn “torture” into “enhanced interrogation,” or murdered children into “collateral damage,” you break the power of language to convey meaning, to make us see, feel, and care."
— Rebecca Solnit “Our Words Are Our Weapons” (via afrometaphysics)

(Source: definitiveme)

70galeri:

Harlem River at Night Blue Reflection | Ernest Lawson

(Source: technicolormuse)

nitanahkohe:

So I know quite a few people who teach young kids, who want to design curricula and provide resources for their students that are respectful of Native communities and teach non-Native kids some cultural sensitivity & histories…but most of them, being non-Native, don’t know where to start with that. My three biggest tips for that have always been to (a) privilege Native voices (b) tie the past with the present (c) don’t fossilize Natives in their own unit—weave these resources and histories together into the broader curriculum, rather than imply to students that Natives are an ethnic oddity or compulsory PC-lesson.

In that vein, I’ve been trying to help a friend who teaches young kids to find some books for the classrooms at her school, so that these things are available to students on the regular and are readily accessible to non-Native teachers looking for resources for their curricula; I have been shocked to see how many disgusting books are out there, written by non-Natives, with no care for cultural sensitivities of any kind! So: here’s some of the books on the list I’m suggesting to my friend—I’m hoping there’s some parents & educators on here that could benefit from the time I’ve spent sorting thru all the gross stuff! Here’s the list, with a brief description (these are mostly targeting the lower end of the K-4 range, but if you’re working with kids on a pre-K level you might also be interested in the selection of books by NW Coast artists at Native Northwest; I’m also compiling a list of books for intermediary/secondary grades and will post that when it’s finished):

  • The Star People (SD Nelson, Standing Rock): A young Lakota girl narrates the story of how she and her little brother, Young Wolf, survive a prairie fire. They had wandered away from their village, entranced by the changing cloud shapes created by the Cloud People. They fall into a river and are guided home by their deceased grandmother, one of the Star People, who are the spirits of the Old Ones. The acrylic illustrations are inspired by the Native American ledger-book art of the late 1800s. 
  • Tallchief (Maria Tallchief, Osage): A picture-book autobiography of the early years of America’s first internationally significant ballerina. The story opens with Tallchief’s birth on an Osage Indian reservation. Her Scots-Irish mother made sure that Maria and her sister received dance and music lessons, and eventually her father persuaded her to choose between piano and dance. The story ends when, at age 17, Maria left home to seek her fame and fortune as a ballerina in New York.
  • Eagle Song (Joseph Bruchac, Abenaki): It’s a shock for fourth-grader Danny Bigtree to move to Brooklyn from his Mohawk Nation reservation: suddenly he has no friends, and his classmates taunt him, asking him where his war pony is and telling him to go home to his teepee. Bruchac weaves into the story the legend of the great peacemaker Aionwahta, who united five warring Indian nations into the Iroquois Confederacy and turned an enemy into an ally. Can Danny be, like Aionwahta, an agent of peace, and find a way to transform the school bully into a friend? This appealing portrayal of a strong family offers an unromanticized view of Native American culture, and a history lesson about the Iroquois Confederacy; it also gives a subtle lesson in the meaning of daily courage.
  • Giving Thanks (Chief Jake Swamp, Mohawk; Erwin Printup, Cayuga & Tuscarora) : A special children’s version of the Thanksgiving Address, a message of gratitude that originated with the Native people of upstate New York and Canada and that is still spoken at ceremonial gatherings held by the Iroquois, or Six Nations.
  • When Beaver Was Very Great (Anne Dunn, Anishinaabe): The short pieces range from folk tales of Native American origin myths (the antics of Beaver, Rabbit, Otter, Bear, and others) to nature writing and contemporary stories of peace, justice, and environmental concern. Brimming with insight, vibrant with strength and beauty, these indeed are stories to live by, for all ages. Divided into the four seasons of the year, many of the stories are perfect to be read aloud to children.
  • When the Rain Sings (various; Ojibwe, Lakota, Omaha, Navajo, Cochiti, Kiowa, Tohono O’odham, Hopi, Ute)A collection of poems by Native Americans in grades 2-12. Most of these selections were written in response to images of Native artifacts or historical photographs. The young writers’ personal reactions and associations to these images leave readers with a strong sense of each one’s experience as a modern Indian, and of the values that each holds dear. The book is a work of art in itself, with dozens of full-color and black-and-white photos from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. The pages are also decorated with detailed border designs. Eight nations are represented.
  • Berry Magic (Betty Huffmon, Yup’ik): Long ago, the only berries on the tundra were hard, tasteless, little crowberries. As Anana watches the ladies complain bitterly while picking berries for the Fall Festival, she decides to use her magic to help. “Atsa-ii-yaa (Berry), Atsa-ii-yaa (Berry), Atsaukina!” (Be a berry!), Anana sings under the full moon turning four dolls into little girls that run and tumble over the tundra creating patches of fat, juicy berries: blueberries, cranberries, salmonberries, and raspberries. The next morning Anana and the ladies fill basket after basket with berries for the Fall Festival. Thanks to Anana, there are plenty of tasty berries for the agutak (Eskimo tee cream) at the festival and forevermore.
  • Sunpainters (Baje Whitethorne, Navajo): Grandfather Pipa calls Kii Leonard into the hogan to tell him that the sun “has died”; a solar eclipse has washed the surrounding mountains in and deep purples and reds. He explains to the boy that he must wait respectfully for the Na’ach’aahii, who come from the Four Directions carrying a paint brush and a can of paint, each responsible for replacing a different color of the rainbow. Repainting the world after the eclipse, the Na’ach’aahii restore life and allow the rebirth of the sun-processes pleasingly depicted in the Southwest-style art.

moniquill:

regina-and-the-dragons:

Pause for a moment.

Does it seem weird to anyone else that the shrinking habitat of polar bears due to global warming gets more attention than the disruption and danger posed to Inuit communities by same?

Boosting the fuck out of this because TRUTH.

(Source: baal-pit)

Christie’s has created this infographic (click to see it in all its huge glory) about painter Jean-Michel Basquiat along with a series of videos that range from poignant to bathetic. Two of Basquiat’s compadres, Al Diaz and Torrick Ablack, remind us that the young Haitian painter was a difficult person and inspiring mentor. More on Art Market Monitor

2damnfeisty:

Salt-N-Pepa - Ain’t Nuthin’ But A She Thing

When I think of feminism and Hip Hop this is the first song that comes to mind. Salt-N-Pepa came into the rap game when no women were getting respect as emcees. Came strutting in heels and spandex and slayed the game. Respect their gangsta.

It’s a she thing and it’s all in me

 I could be anything that I want to be 

Don’t consider me a minority 

Open up your eyes and maybe you’ll see 

It’s a she thing and it’s all in me

I could be anything that I want to be 

Don’t consider me a minority 

Ladies help me out if you agree It’s a she thing

takuvunga:

Rigoberta Menchú Tum, militante pour les droits des peuples indigènes mayas du Guatemala. Née en 1959 dans une famille de paysans appartenant à la branche Quiche des peuples Mayas. Elle s’est impliquée dès son adolescence dans la lutte pour les droits des femmes. La famille Menchu a été accusée de prendre part à la guerrilla, Le père de RIgoberta, Vicente, a rejoint le Comité de l’Union des Paysans (CUC) après avoir été emprisonné et torturé pour avoir prétendument participé à l’exécution d’un propriétaire de plantation local. Rigoberta Menchu a également rejoint le CUC en 1979. Son frère a été arrêté, torturé et tué par l’armée, son père tué par les forces de sécurité de la capitale, sa mère tuée après avoir été arrêtée, torturée et violée. Rigoberta s’est de plus en plus impliquée dans le CUC, et a été une personnalité proéminente lors de plusieurs grèves et manifestations revendiquant entre autres de meilleures conditions de travail pour les paysans.  Elle a rejoint en 1981 le radical Front Populaire, au sein duquel elle a contribué en éduquant la population paysanne indigène à résister à l’oppression militaire massive. Elle a alors dû se cacher, au Guatemala, puis fuir au Mexique. Elle s’est alors lancée dans l’organisation à l’étranger de la résistance à l’oppression au Guatemala et dans la défense des droits des populations paysannes. Elle est devenue une actrice majeure et mondialement reconnue de la lutte pour les droits des indigènes et la réconciliation ethno-culturelle.
http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1992/tum.html

takuvunga:

Rigoberta Menchú Tum, militante pour les droits des peuples indigènes mayas du Guatemala.
Née en 1959 dans une famille de paysans appartenant à la branche Quiche des peuples Mayas. Elle s’est impliquée dès son adolescence dans la lutte pour les droits des femmes. La famille Menchu a été accusée de prendre part à la guerrilla, Le père de RIgoberta, Vicente, a rejoint le Comité de l’Union des Paysans (CUC) après avoir été emprisonné et torturé pour avoir prétendument participé à l’exécution d’un propriétaire de plantation local. Rigoberta Menchu a également rejoint le CUC en 1979. Son frère a été arrêté, torturé et tué par l’armée, son père tué par les forces de sécurité de la capitale, sa mère tuée après avoir été arrêtée, torturée et violée. Rigoberta s’est de plus en plus impliquée dans le CUC, et a été une personnalité proéminente lors de plusieurs grèves et manifestations revendiquant entre autres de meilleures conditions de travail pour les paysans.  Elle a rejoint en 1981 le radical Front Populaire, au sein duquel elle a contribué en éduquant la population paysanne indigène à résister à l’oppression militaire massive. Elle a alors dû se cacher, au Guatemala, puis fuir au Mexique. Elle s’est alors lancée dans l’organisation à l’étranger de la résistance à l’oppression au Guatemala et dans la défense des droits des populations paysannes. Elle est devenue une actrice majeure et mondialement reconnue de la lutte pour les droits des indigènes et la réconciliation ethno-culturelle.

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1992/tum.html

"Trauma impels people both to withdraw from close relationships and to seek them desperately. The profound disruption in basic trust, the common feelings of shame, guilt, and inferiority, and the need to avoid reminders of the trauma that might be found in social life, all foster withdrawal from close relationships. But the terror of the traumatic event intensifies the need for protective attachments. The traumatized person therefore frequently alternates between isolation and anxious clinging to others. […] It results in the formation of intense, unstable relationships that fluctuate between extremes."

Judith Herman, “Trauma and Recovery” (via lavenderlabia)

aka borderline personality disorder

:\

(via youarenotyou)

Stuff I have finally been starting to sort out the past few months after several years of PTSD and what’s now being labelled BPD. & writing about exactly this for my zine (plus with race) (always race).

(via readnfight)

(Source: psychologicalsnippets)

thepeoplesrecord:

So real.

Thanks for this important commentary!

(Source: rebeccacohenart)

blacksupervillain:

y’all are so boring with your harry potter world-building and meta

talk to me about some shit like anti-capitalist liberation wizardology in latin american wizarding schools

(Source: shmurdapunk)